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I think he's close to finally dying and wants to take over brans body but I do believe he will fail. Maybe I worded that poorly. No, Bloodraven may try to take Brans body in the same manner as the others use Craster's sons. Ah gotcha, yea I could definitely see that being a possibility. I just think Bran is especially attractive to Bloodraven because of his especially strong magic blood, but I think that this greed for power will be his undoing, as I think whatever it is that Bran has will be too strong for Bloodraven to take or control. What I like the most about your theory is that it makes Bolt-On absolutely possible.

That is totally correct. Just to feed the fire a little on that one: Remember how Varamyr and Orell teach us that trained skinchangers can sense each other. Melisandre has red eyes , red hair too, that is most likely dyed of course. But eyes can't be dyed. Are her superior abilities from the mark?

Yep, I think she has already been revived through the "kiss of fire" which has more to do with the kissee than the kisser. I think it's probably a prerequisite for the shadowbinding skills. I really, really like this, even though I disagree with some parts. It's well formulated, for one. Same as our own physics, really, just In that case, Ironborn aren't quite wrong when they claim they are older, came from West, came from Sea. Why not have R'Hollor be another "hive mind" like what the CotF have, which would explain the similarity of those two sets of "visions"?

It would make sense that lords and kings became lords and kings by being stronger, so that's why their "blood" has power, and not the other way around. It's not Kingsblood Mel needs, but "Power Blood". We do know something like that happens with Giants, so why not here? Though as you say, the Pact might have been done in a different way, and FM learned from CotF either way. The legends of seriously Old Kings I have most issue with: I even tried to go through the various banners of FM vs Andals to see if FM have animals more often, sadly it was bust: All agree on the Essos part, except that it might be Dothraki shunned those forests because CotF skinchangers can take away their horses from them at crucial moments.

Which is my personal tinfoil on why Valyria avoided Westeros for so long. I never saw the idea that dragonlords might be skinchangers, so kudos on that: Pity that George scraped the idea of Dany going there looks like curse the lost 5-year gap! What do you think about the idea that whatever gave us Long Night and broke the seasons and possibly turned magic users against each other?

Fire vs Ice, Water vs. Drogon was tethering from a couple of spears, in both show and book. I'm saying that Ice seems seriously over-powered already by the end of ADWD, and I doubt that the end of saga will be some easy-handshake, with little conflict against Ice. But not fast and not by sacrificing a single Jon Snow. Though, we don't know either way, so any speculation might be true in the end. I submit that the leader of the White Walkers is the powerful direwolf warg, the original baby taker himself, builder of castles and giant ice walls, with the ancestral sword "Ice", Brandon the Builder.

If you're right and this means that Bran the Builder counts as alive then this quote:. As for the Night's King the form I prefer , in the books he is a legendary figure, akin to Lann the Clever and Brandon the Builder, and no more likely to have survived to the present day than they have. I know Preston Jacobs believes the leader of the white walkers to be a or the Brandon too. Not sure if he's ever done a video addressing that specifically though. I agree only to the extent that any magic isn't validation of any religion in the story, as a wide variety of magic exists.

I do not believe that it will be GRRM's style or taste to either validate or eliminate the existence of the gods. They will still be ambiguous by the end of the series.

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Unfortunately, this post is another example where people take every myth, legend, folktale and prophecy as factual in the secondary world of the books. The bulk of these tales are to provide colour and richness to the world - like our own, each community has its own tales. The bulk of them will be just that, without any manifestation in the books to come, but we don't know which.

GRRM vetted the material so it didn't contradict or spoil the plot he is planning. Otherwise the purpose of that book is to fill in details of the world, for those who want them, that otherwise are not key to the story. Elio and Linda did not write any new material whatsoever - they've been very clear about this. What they did was just what they have been doing for years - compiling the random info into organized categories. That's basically grunt work that George doesn't have time for. All of the eastern sections was written by George.

When our author takes the time to write hundreds of thousands of words, I don't see how anyone can dismiss it as window dressing. You're basically saying that George is wasting his time, which I have to take umbrage at. Not saying YOU made this claim - you came close - but it's out there, and it's rubbish. No, of course not - it represents the knowledge of the maesters.

But that's no different than all the other ASOIAF material, where we are only ever given the info of the POV we are reading, and we have to decide what is true and not. Finally, your assertion about some myths being irrelevant - what's that based on? Anything other than your own opinion? I can't imagine how anyone would even make this claim in such a declarative fashion.

How would you know what myths are relevant to the main story? How would you know that some are just window dressing? I'm not trying to be mean - but you're simply making baseless assertions here. It seems you got bad information - and I know people are running around saying Elio and Linda wrote most of it, that it's just filler, etc etc. It's all very clearly laid out, and Elio has said the same thing multiple times on Westeros.

The stuff written by GRRM is clearly delineated by being quoted from a different maester than the main 'author' of the book. I don't know where you are getting you numbers from, they are bunk. The whole idea of the project was that Elio and Linda would do most of the work, and he'd vet it, freeing his time for whatever he does instead of writing TWOW.

However they had gaps, GRRM said he'd write something, and then he wrote copious amounts of material. This was way too much for a coffee table book, so is being held back for an eventual 'GRRMarillion' - a history of the Targs to be published after the main series. Then you verge close to using a straw man argument. I do not dispute that the book is canon, never have.

He did vet all of it. However my position is that it is an 'optional' book for people who want more history and lore about lands and cultures and families that are not crucial to the main novels. It is more world building for fans who obsess more than most about minor houses and far away lands. This is why I have a problem with it being cited for predictions about the main series. No, your information is incorrect. Again, listen to the podcast with Elio. George wrote the majority of the book, all the new information, and everything in the entire eastern section.

Where did you get this idea that Martin only wrote the words of the second maester? That is absolutely wrong. Your assertion about TWOIAF being optional and won't be needed for people reading the main series - this assertion is based on nothing. Get your facts straight before you go around sewing misinformation, brother.

You might want to double check your information, because if you wrong, which you are, you're disrespecting the author. Ok, so I found out where you got the idea that George only wrote the sidebars - that's from an older SSM, from before the release of the book. That indeed seems to have been the original plan, but that's not the way it ended up.

So you're information is simply outdated:. Why, you might ask, is George R. Because he can't stop writing about Westeros! Along with Essos, Sothoryos, and Ulthos, of course. All of this is made abundantly clear in the Podcast of Ice and Fire interview with Elio, which is here:. No ill will towards you man, just please double check your information before you go spreading it around.

The original plan, way back in , was that we would largely work independently from George while he worked on the next novel. After some preliminary discussion and our presenting just an outline sketching out the structure -- which got his blessing -- we got to work. The first step was to collect all the information we had from the novels and things George had informed fans of in various emails, readings, and so on. Fortunately, we had the Concordance and So Spake Martin collection to help with that.

We filled out the outline with all the relevant information for each section, and then proceeded to do our best to write the text using the information we had. For a long time, George was not really involved because, again, he was busy with ADwD. However, the idea would be that once he was done with that, he'd go over our text and help fill in any gaps or point out any issues where the information we had was misleading or incorrect.

And that sort of did happen. George did go over it, sending back notes, filling gaps Rather than send us a handful of notes that we would flesh out as we had imagined he would do , he just set to and started writing He wrote a lot of text, and with amazing rapidity. Every section was enriched. It's part of the reason a book originally contracted for 50, words ended up at , Many of the names of maesters and the titles of their works, and many anecdotes related to those texts, are "color" that we invented.

Coming up with names of texts -- Songs the Drowned Men Sing is one we're particularly proud of -- was one of our favorite aspects of the process. In the main body of the text, there are places where we thought there was a hole in our knowledge that needed some sort of filling, because a maester would simply know it. In those cases, we would speculate out a possible bit of history to fill that gap, and then we marked them generally with a note saying it's speculative, sometimes that combined with red text to make it really stand out so that when George went over the draft, he could see it.

In some cases he kept what we speculated untouched, noting that he was okay with it. Sometimes, he even ran with it and elaborated on it, which was particularly satisfying from our perspective. A good example here: As an example, we presented a very speculative, and brief, version of the history of the Rhoynar flight to Dorne. George wracked his brain and asked if we had drawn from something he told us, and we said no, it was all purely speculative rather than spinning out from some arcane tidbit he'd shared with fans.

So, a few days later, we got a lengthy file containing his history of the Rhoynar which was very, very different than anything we could have imagined. You can see part of that text here. Everything went by George, in the end, and everything speculative was particularly called to his attention. It's also worth noting that the nearer we got to the "present" of the narrative, the less with felt like we could try speculation. Ancient history is one thing, because the knowledge of the maesters is imperfect in regards to the far past sometimes in regards to the near past, too, but that's a different story and so our speculative flights of fancy were more likely to fall within the range of what George thought probable as a maester's knowledge.

Once we get into the lifetimes of the characters in ASoIaF, though, history is much surer, and George has a much stronger idea on what those characters were up to. Can you shed any light on how George's process works? Does he brainstorm, outline, then first draft, then who knows what, then next draft, then restructure, then final pass. It seems like there are several stages of "done" and it would be interesting to see how he goes about such a large task. When George finally turned his hand to the book, all we basically saw was his going through our draft, and making some notes.

He noticed, as we all had, that there were a lot of places where we needed extensive notes and that's where he offered to write some brief sidebars, casting them as material from Archmaester Gyldayn. Then he started sending in sidebars How did he do it? I have no idea. I will say that Parris told us that George was writing like a man possessed -- Westeros was just coming to life in his head, and he would toss and turn at night with all sorts of ideas brewing and then in the morning he was off immediately to his office to get these things down.

The output, and the rapidity of it, was astonishing. Along the way, George went through each of our drafted sections and in many cases expanded and polished them as a way to flesh things out without going the whole "Here's 10, words of brand new text" route. Was there any material that you regret having to cut from the final product due to space or not being able to work it into the structure of the book? If we could have used all of George's write ups, we would have, but then the book would have pushed , words and that just wasn't feasible.

I am solely referring to descriptions of the process discussed when the book was released or shortly before. I really didn't give a shit before. Regardless of the authorship, I stand over my position as to the intent of the book and it's niche as a world book for the nerds. I'm not contending it is fan fiction. Number 1 didn't happen and none of the rest are acceptable.

The main reason for my original comments was that again, people are taking all the lore in the world and using it as evidence to draw conclusions. They miss the point about story telling, legends, myths and his sensibilities and nuance as an author. They seem to want to dumb it down to Eragon or similar. Actually, quite a lot of "wacky" stuff like the gemstone emperors of the Great Empire of the Dawn or the Deep Ones actually DO make appearances in the main novels. It's just that a lot of it is around the margins and was not noticed. I wouldn't say George is downplaying his involvement - he's quite frank about the fact that he wrote a ton of stuff for it.

I think it's all pretty consistent - at first, it was basically going to be a prose version of the Wikipedia of ice and fire which Elio and Linda compiled form the scattered details in the books, but when George became involved, he wrote a ton of stuff for the book. My position is that if George took the time to write it, and it's about ASOIAF, then it's potentially important and nobody has any basis to say it isn't, or to diminish it it any way, or to say it shouldn't be used for theories, essays, etc. It seems like you are projecting your own biases about real mythology onto ASOAIF, which is something I see fairly often from people who are inclined to dismiss the old stories and folklore.

It's not spoiling anything - just as new information we got about Bloodraven in the Dunk and Egg series wasn't spoiling the main series, but building on it and providing us with more information about it. And primarily, TWOIAF reveals the past, which of course will have ramifications for the future, but it's not really "spoiling" anything. You see a problem with this; I do not.

Not sure why you have a problem with that. Yeah, seems like it. Can you read the five books only and enjoy the series, and understand the broad strokes? But would you be ignorant of many important facts about Bloodraven? This one doesn't make sense. Martin will leave things as ambiguous or clear as he wants.

You are the only one who sees a problem with this, and I have no idea why. So again, your assertions are based on nothing but your own opinion, and you opinion contradicts George Martin, who put his name on the book. I rest my case. I get your criticism here and I agree that most of the legends in the book won't have any role to play. There's a lot in TWoIaF that's just a compendium of the mythology which has already been mentioned in the asoiaf. Mostly, I'm trying to look at the commonalities between all the myths to come to an underlying truth. I'll be getting closer to the main story in the next sections and thus somewhat less reliant on the world book.

I've been grinding this axe for some time now - the gods will remain off stage and ambiguous. I think George has gotten around the gods thing by making them all just men. Which makes sense with the "more than we already do" part of grrm's quote on the subject. You may be right, and the broad questions of the nature of the gods might not be made explicit. I would not be surprised by that. However, we know Martin's feelings on gods and religion in our real world, and I think he has drawn his world, even with magic, in a similar vein. This is the best big picture theory I've ever read. Looking forward to the next parts and they mysteries they inspire.

This seems to address the disparity between the timelines of legend and "maester-modernity" and the existence of dragons pre Valyria. Love this, can't wait for part 2.

The Emperor's Opal

I had a wild idea a couple of months ago that maybe the ice dragon is somewhere in the wall? Sounds crazy but I thought it through a bit. Something that particularly seemed to hint at this could be something Maester Aemon said to Sam while on route to Oldtown: Also Mel's power being stronger at the wall? One more thing, the horn of Joramun, how it's supposed to bring down the wall, and Euron's magic horn and how it's supposed to summon dragons. Thought there could possibly be a connection there.

Again just an idea, it would be nice to see King Jon Starkgaryen ride into battle on Winter, his giant Ice dragon. I liked the beginning, but i felt like you were drifting into too much fantasy, especially concerning the great empire of dawn. GRRM has concerned me with 1 his extensive scifi background, and 2 various statements suggesting he sees little difference between scifi and fantasy.

Because I like hard scifi, and I don't tend to like fantasy though WoT may have really ruined me on the genre. So I half-fear that my taste for scifi and historical fiction might explain my "enchantment" with probably the 3rd or 4th fantasy series I've ever really liked eg, Amber, LOTR, can't remember the other, and definitely asoiaf. And I don't think I'd like asoiaf if it were scifi at all. So I'm all for the fantasy: And I guess I simply don't like the scifi theories I've read about asoiaf though I go there myself sometimes , like global warming and shit.

I hate propaganda with the passion of a thousand red comets. So I'd love asoiaf to be pure fantasy, and while I understand your concern about explaining the Dawn empire, I don't think any of this would be spelled out in the books at all. Look for helping with it. Stuff like this would be perfect! I'm on mobile, so don't have the quotes but here's the gist. Remember there's no wall at this point and the Starks are kings of Winter.

There is a passage somewhere that says the first men settled the lands all the way to the land of always winter. So that would be included in the Starks domain. Can't say I agree with everything but what an awesome read, the best post on this sub in a while. Macro theories like this are so awesome they make the micro ones look insignificant.

Great job, can't wait for part 2. I made a post a few months back covering the Great Empire of the Dawn, and it seems we think a lot alike! They definitely had a very important effect on the world. I'm a big ancient history buff, so it's stuff like this that really draws my attention. It's a shame we probably won't get to read more about them, but that's the beauty of this series, it keeps us wondering.

Cool, yeah we are definitely of similar mind on this. Part two should be out in a day or two and that will cover the long night, the first Dayne, and more related to the empire's influence. I really like this idea, but if this is the case why can't Wights pass underneath the wall? Was this a magic cast on the wall long after it was initially built? We've always been told the wall was built to keep the WWs out, but perhaps it was the WWs who built the wall to keep man out of the north. Now that Wildlings had been moving further and further north, the WWs could no longer tolerate it and are aiming to push them back, and perhaps even more.

More to come in part 2 about the wall and its purpose. Hopefully I'll have it out in a day or two, but it has been slow going. This is so good! What you propose really seems plausible. It's like a breakthrough in my mind! I love the idea of the black pool in Winterfell being the site where an ice dragon demised. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

Log in or sign up in seconds. All story information must be hidden. That would all change as new players entered the game. The line between good and evil became increasingly blurred. I was forced to rethink all I believed in while Tammy and I were racing across central Europe, dodging sorcerers, demons and magical traps. Tamantha McKinley, my newly minted wizard partner, would be tested as we neared the end of our journey. You see, Orphanus, the Emperor's Opal, contains enough magical power to greatly enhance the abilities of any magical creature and Tammy's both gifted and ambitious.

I wasn't at all sure she would be able to resist its lure once we found it. What would happen to her if she couldn't? For that matter, what would happen to me? Read more Read less. About the Author I was born in Montreal in the Summer of Createspace December 8, Language: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now.

Please try again later. This is one of the best books I have read in quite a long time. It captures your interest from the first page and grows in suspense and curosity as you read on. I found it difficult to put the book aside and could not wait until my next opportunity to rejoin the mystery. What else can I say, this is a marvously written book! One person found this helpful. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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The poet's second collection. Praise from Thomas Lux. An issue devoted to New England, its landscape and voices. Interview with David Morris. Near fine stapled wraps. Neat owner's name to opening flyleaf which bothers none of the text. Fine and bright in like pictorial dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout. Near fine bright wraps; strong spine. No creasing anywhere on this copy. The Independent Group or The IG, best known for having launched Pop Art, but the young artists, architects and critics who met informally at the London's Institute for Contemporary Art in early s were actually embarked on a far more subversive and constructive mission, than the founding of an Art Movement.

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Inscribed to another poet by Kirk Robertson on the full title page. Illustrated and fine all around. Very good or better cloth copy with clean text throughout. Close to fine and bright in like price-clipped dustjacket, with some age tone to the jacket. Otherwise quite attractive all around. Fine and bright maroon boards in near fine dustjacket with light age tone. Otherwise quite handsome all around.

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One of copies, numbered and signed by the poet. Highly attractive in folded booklet. With complimentary sheet enclosed. Rodee, Marian and James Ostoer. University of New Mexico Press, Close to fine oblong decorative wraps. Cover Zuni Aesthetics in the use of their materials and technique. Also various profiles of carving families from the Leekya family to the Rhoda Quam, Leonard and Herbert Halate, the Cheama family and many others.

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Highly attractive and appears unread. Near fine stiff wraps with clean bright text throughout. Excellent black and white photographs of each artist. Fine and bright in very good price-clipped dustjacket with clean bright text throughout.


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Beautiful photographs, black and white throughout, of the artists and their work. Illustrated by Bill Negron. Fine and bright boards in very good dustjacket although with a mend on both dustjacket folds. The poet and anthologist and Mexican diarist takes us on a portrait of Latin American literature. North Atlantic Books, Fine bright pictorial stiff wraps with excellent square spine and crisp text throughout.

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Selected Prose of Theodore Roethke. University of Washington Press, Review copy with card enclosed. Near fine and bright in like rubbed dustjacket. Bright Hill Press, Very close to fine decorative stiff wraps with excellent spine and crisp text. Small sticker shadow to back cover which bothers none of the text. Near fine green boards with bright clean text throughout. Fine and very bright in like illustrated dustjacket with crisp unread text. Very fine and bright stiff wraps with excellent square spine and crisp text throughout.

Praise by Tomaz Salamun. National Poetry Series selected by Mary Oliver. A Richard Avedon photograph from Near fine copy with no mailing label. A clean copy with interior pages aging slightly. Joe Dallesandro "Natural Man". Rolling Stones on tour. Conversation with Paul Morrissey. Fine and very bright pictorial stiff wraps with strong square spine and crisp bright text throughout. Ronk, Dave Van with Elijah Wald. Very good or better stiff wraps with clean text throughout. Close to fine stapled wraps with minor age-toning. The issue features the work of John Taggart and Harrison Fisher.

Very good green boards with gilt lettering with clean text throughout. Tissue sheet between frontispiece photograph and full title page cleanly removed. Very fine and bright in like pictorial dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout. A very handsome copy. Very fine and bright stiff wraps with strong square spine and bright crisp text throughout. Very fine and bright like pictorial dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout.

Profusely illustrated throughout and elegant. The Museum of Modern Art, Near fine oblong stiff wraps with strong spine and clean text throughout. Profusely illustrated throughout in black and white and color. Tiny, tiny name, barely noticeable, on opening flyleaf. Light age tone to back cover, along one edge. Near fine wraps with strong square spine.

Former owner's neat lining and notes, nothing offensive. West End Press, Near fine and bright in like dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout. Bottom corner of front flap snipped; price in upper right hand corner intact. Preface by John Logan. Fine and bright red cloth with gilt images in near fine or close to fine dustjacket. With a note by Richard Howard. Close to fine decorative stiff wraps with excellent spine. Another poet's signature to opening page which bothers none of the text. The poet Nina Nyhart's who published her own work through AliceJames books neat signature to the opening flyleaf, nothing at all offensive.

Including work by Leslie Silko, Simon J. Very close to fine and bright in like dustjacket. Contemporary Poetry by American Indians. Near fine in like bright dustjacket with crisp text throughout. Publisher's line and a neat owner's name to the opening flyleaf. Near fine bright wraps all around. Small sticker to back cover. Young Bear and others. Rediscovering the Voices of the Original Text.

MODERATORS

Fine and bright in very close to fine price-clipped dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout. Jacket illustration by William Blake. Deserved praise by Donald Hall and Hayden Carruth. Rosenberg, David and Harold Bloom. Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Rosenberg, Martin and William Cole, editor. Near fine boards with clean text throughout. Rosenberger, Francis Coleman, editor. A Selection of New Poetry. Near fine in like dustjacket with slight chipping to heel of spine.


  1. Encounters with Authors!
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  4. Trifle rub to cover. Subtle stamp "Collection Kenneth Durant" to half and full title pages. Confronting the Prison Crisis. Some lining to text; an excellent reading copy. Introduction by Colin Wilson. Close to fine decorative stiff wraps with excellent spine and crisp text. Near fine pictorial stiff wraps with strong spine and clean text throughout. Front cover full photograph of the poet, top and bottom title and author tabs cleanly removed. Close to fine and bright stiff wraps with excellent spine. The Coming Control of Life. Three color fold out booklet with wrap around band.

    One of 75 copies. Cover by Rochelle Kraut. We notice some pages with neat underlining. Oxford University Press, Near fine in like dustjacket with gentle shelf rub and clean text. Fine and bright wraps with excellent spine and crisp text. Signature of the poet Gary Metras and dated inside cover neatly.

    Moderate checkmarks and line to a few pages. Fine and bright in like price-clipped dustjacket with crisp bright text throughout. Fine and bright gatefold wraps with crisp bright text throughout. With illustrations and photographs. Very good or better bright wraps with strong spine. Clean text but for subtle owner's name. Trifle lining to text; nothing at all offense. Long obituary essay to Paul Blackburn from Seymour Krim with photographs. Very good wraps with square spine and clean text throughout. Very good or better wraps with strong spine and clean text throughout.

    Moderate lining to text; nothing offensive. Very good wraps with strong spine and clean text. Very good wraps with square spine and clean text. Pale small stamp of owner's name to back cover. Illustrated text and clean. Fine and bright illustrated stiff wraps with strong square spine and crisp bright text throughout.

    Very close to fine red boards with gilt lettering with crisp bright text throughout. Frontispiece photograph of the poet. Neat former owner's attractive bookplate to inside boards and signature to full title page, quite attractive all around. With informative marginalia, nothing offensive. Transcending the Totalitarian Classroom. One of the leaders of the Berkeley Free Speech Movement who survived intact to write a theory of education to come from the Student Radical Movement.

    One of the finer comprehensive surveys on the legendary Living Theatre. Near fine and bright pictorial stiff wraps with strong spine and clean bright text throughout. Loaded with photographs and activity. Antigone, Frankenstein, Paradise Now. Also includes an appendix of selected documents and reviews from the American press. Rostenberg, Leona and Madeline Stern. With rub to cover. Near fine oversize stiff wraps with clean text throughout.

    We note a few pages with very minor marking. With an introduction by Alfred Kazin. Near fine pictorial stiff wraps with strong square spine and crisp bright text throughout. Early printing with rounded shoulders to the design, and light age tone. Special Pre-Impeachment Edition with new introduction by the author.

    First edition, first printing. Very close to fine in like bright dustjacket with crisp text throughout. One of the more scarcer titles by the author. University of Georgia Press, Reviewer's sheets enclosed along with CD. Very fine and bright wraps with crisp text throughout. New Poems and Translations. Fine wraps with excellent spine and crisp text. Fine and bright in near fine dustjacket with gentle rub to cover and crisp text throughout. Comes to America ". Fine and bright pictorial stiff wraps with strong square spine and crisp text throughout.

    Tiny line to bottom edge, nothing at all offensive.